What is a neuropsychological evaluation like for my child?

A neuropsychologist studies the relationship between a person’s brain and her behavior—how she does things, how she responds to her environment, how she copes with situations.

A neuropsychological assessment is a series of tests conducted by the neuropsychologist (and sometimes members of his team) to evaluate how well your child is able to function in the world after TBI.

The assessment for children and teens is done through a series of games and exercises designed to show how your child’s brain is functioning. If your child’s injury is recent, the assessment may be fairly short, about one to two hours. If some time has passed since the injury, the assessment can be more comprehensive and may take most of a day.

To prepare your child for the assessment:
  • Be sure she is well rested and has had a good breakfast.
  • Reassure her that this is not a painful doctor visit—no needles or painful tools are used.
  • Tell her the assessment is a series of games and exercises, so she can expect to have fun. In fact, it will be a lot like a day at school, with fun activities and thinking exercises.
After the assessment, your child may be mentally tired. Be sure to provide time for her to rest and recuperate.

What is a neuropsychological evaluation like for my child?

Sep 24, 2013, 17:22 PM
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A neuropsychologist studies the relationship between a person’s brain and her behavior—how she does things, how she responds to her environment, how she copes with situations.

A neuropsychological assessment is a series of tests conducted by the neuropsychologist (and sometimes members of his team) to evaluate how well your child is able to function in the world after TBI.

The assessment for children and teens is done through a series of games and exercises designed to show how your child’s brain is functioning. If your child’s injury is recent, the assessment may be fairly short, about one to two hours. If some time has passed since the injury, the assessment can be more comprehensive and may take most of a day.

To prepare your child for the assessment:
  • Be sure she is well rested and has had a good breakfast.
  • Reassure her that this is not a painful doctor visit—no needles or painful tools are used.
  • Tell her the assessment is a series of games and exercises, so she can expect to have fun. In fact, it will be a lot like a day at school, with fun activities and thinking exercises.
After the assessment, your child may be mentally tired. Be sure to provide time for her to rest and recuperate.
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